Cultural Partnership puts focus on jobs for young people

17 November 2014

The North East Culture Partnership is convening an employer’s event aimed at encouraging more young people to be given roles as apprentices and interns across the cultural and arts sector.

The ‘Funding to take on apprentices and interns’ session will explore how arts and cultural organisations in the North East grow their workforces and create jobs and training opportunities for 16 to 24 year olds.

Supported by the Creative Employment Programme (CEP), it will take place from 10.00am-12.00noon on Friday 28 November at the Laing Art Gallery, New Bridge Street, Newcastle upon Tyne.

CEP is a £15m Arts Council England fund designed to support arts and cultural organisations with the cost of recruiting apprentices and paid interns. Employers could receive funding if they work within the art forms of music, dance, theatre, literature, visual arts, contemporary craft, combined arts, galleries, circus, carnival arts, museums and libraries. Since launching in March 2013 the programme has created over 2,000 new job opportunities across England for young people who were previously unemployed.

The event aims to bring together eligible employers from across the arts and cultural sector in the North East to learn more about the specifics of the programme, including:

•    What funding is available and how to apply
•    How employing a young person can help to diversify their workforce, bring in new
     skills, and reach out to wider audiences
•    The benefits of applying for funding as a 'consortium' with other local partners – 
     view best practice examples from existing CEP consortia.

John Mowbray, Co-chair, NECP, said: “The Creative Employment Programme is a key tool in getting young people who are interested in culture and the arts, working within the sector. I would urge relevant employers to engage with CEP and register to attend the event. It’s an important initiative we’re proud to play host to in the North East and we’re pleased that a number of employers, interns and apprentices are willing to share their experiences on the day.”  

Jane Tarr, Director, Organisational Resilience and Environmental Sustainability, Arts Council England, said: “The success of the CEP initiative has been exceptional to date and I’m positive that we can build on this further in the North East. This event aims to get as many suitable employers involved as possible in order to secure apprenticeships and paid internships for young people who often have a great enthusiasm for culture and the arts and hold aspirations of working within the sector.”

For further information contact:
Culture Partnership Manager: Jonathan Blackie on 07802 917014 or jonathan.blackie@northeastcouncils.gov.uk


Note for editors:

North East Culture Partnership: Background and achievements  
The North East Culture Partnership (NECP) enables the region’s cultural organisations to work strategically with local authorities, business and universities to develop the cultural agenda for the North East. Our partnership is ambitious about what culture can bring to communities and how it can create distinctiveness. In a time of change and economic challenge the NECP is campaigning for new funding and more regional influence over funding decisions as an important part of the region’s development.

Our Board of 24 includes elected members from each North East local authority as well as leaders from universities, arts and heritage organisations and business. NECP is supported within Association of North East Councils.

North East Culture Partnership is:

•    Developing 15 year vision for culture in the North East.
•    Providing advocacy for culture with LEPs and strategic brokerage around EU  
     funding.
•    Working with NE business to develop 100 artists’ residencies.
•    Linking festival offer through a new festivals website.
•    Coordinating five universities support for creative SMEs.

NECP is working at a time of unprecedented local authority cuts which has seen a drastic reduction in the number of arts and heritage officers as well as challenging cuts to venues, events and libraries. Despite this the 12 local authorities, five universities and business sector continue to recognise the value of culture and the positive contribution it makes to the North East economy and communities.